Making Ford trucks become one with the air/wind

To obtain good mileage per gallon of fuel, it is my opinion that the exterior body of a vehicle must be less wind resistant and the weight of the vehicle must be light. The most wind resistant parts of a vehicle are the bumpers, front grille, windshield, and side view mirrors. The aforementioned parts of a vehicle must be designed and angled in such a way to efficiently channel air/wind flow over and around the sides of the vehicle whereby air/wind pressure will not impede the forward motion of the vehicle. For instance:

Front Bumper - Designed, shaped, and angled in such a way as to channel air/
wind flow to the sides of the vehicle

Front Grille - Sloped/Angled in such a way as to efficiently channel air/wind
flow to the windshield

Windshield - Possible semi-circle shape; Windshield designed on a degree
slope and angled in such a way as to deflect air/wind flow
efficiently over the top of the vehicle and assist in channeling
air/wind flow along the sides of the vehicle

Side View Mirrors - Designed to be less wind resistant and to assist in the
channeling of air/wind flow along the sides of the vehicle

It is the pressure of air/wind that slows the vehicle down while in motion and causes
more fuel to be expended. If the exterior body of a truck is designed and engineered to channel air/wind pressure over and around the sides of the truck, this truck would get better mileage traveled per gallon of fuel as compared to other trucks sold by Chevrolet, GMC, Dodge, and the foreign truck makers. Work trucks would get better fuel mileage also. As it relates to pickup trucks, you can not go wrong with this formula:

Advanced Aerodynamic Exterior Body Styling + Low Truck Curb Weight + Lightweight
Efficient - Performance Engine = Further Distrance Traveled per Gallon Of Fuel

Please consider this aerodynamic suggestion when you produce the code name: P525
pickup truck. Let the P stand for "Performance Series of pickup trucks" The Ford P525
pickup truck "AeroBolt Edition"

If a pickup truck can penetrate the wind easily, you would not need a large displacement engine to make the truck go faster or farther and you may can reduce the size of the fuel tank because you get more mileage per gallon of fuel.

P

Paul P 12/22/2012
The idea is good for a "Gentleman's" truck but I'm not sure it would work for me. Aerodynamic can always be implemented but low curb weight usually translates to less payload and vehicle integrity when it comes to doing the work. I do a lot of towing and plowing so I need something "tough" that will hold up to the punishment of weight and abuse. Low curb weight does not figure in well with that. Your idea may be a great seller to reintroduce a F-100 type vehicle for the urban pick-up enthusiast but I am willing to compromise gas mileage for vehicle integrity and performance.