Join the Live Chat with Ford and AAA to Talk About Helping Teens Drive More Safely

It’s back to school time, and for many teens, that will mean driving themselves back-and-forth to school. Here are a couple of startling statistics to start the school year off: Vehicle crashes are the No. 1 killer of teenagers in America and nearly 3,000 teens die annually in such accidents, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Additionally, a AAA crash analysis showed that after-school weekday hours of 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. are nearly as dangerous for 16- and 17-year-old drivers as weekend nights. There are steps that teens and parents can take to help change these numbers.

To learn more, join the live chat with Susan M. Cischke – Group Vice President, Sustainability, Environment and Safety Engineering, Ford Motor Company – and Jack Peet – AAA Michigan Traffic Safety Manager – here on Thursday, September 1, 2011, at 1:30 p.m. EST.

Ford Driving Skills for Life (DSFL) was established in 2003 by Ford Motor Company Fund, the Governors Highway Safety Association, and a panel of safety experts to teach newly licensed teens the necessary skills for safe driving beyond what they learn in standard driver education programs.

Ford DSFL helps young drivers improve their skills in four key areas that are critical factors in more than 60 percent of vehicle crashes including:

  • Hazard Recognition
  • Vehicle Handling
  • Speed Management
  • Space Management

You can learn more about DSFL at drivingskillsforlife.com.

AAA has a full range of tools to help parents and teens throughout the whole learning-to-drive process. Keys2Drive provides parents an easy way to work with their teens through each step, from choosing a driver education program to deciding when solo driving is permitted. Visit teendriving.aaa.com for more information.

Susan Cischke responsibilities include influencing future environmental and safety regulations and assuring that Ford Motor Company meets or exceeds all safety and environmental regulations worldwide. She is responsible for establishing the long-term safety strategy for Ford, promoting aggressive standardization of product technology features delivering real world safety benefits. As the chief safety officer for Ford, she leads the Driving Skills for Life program, a partnership between Ford Motor Company and the Governor’s State Highway Traffic Association that teaches safe driving technique to teens.

Jack Peet is AAA Traffic Safety Manager for The Auto Club Group (ACG), the largest affiliation of AAA clubs in the Midwest. He oversees traffic and safety-related services, including Teen Driving Safety. He joined AAA after 27 years of service with the Michigan State Police, which included various managerial roles.

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20 COMMENTS ON THIS ARTICLE
Jim McCulley I have been working with this program in the schools and have teens come back and thank us for worrying about them.they do not understand the pitfalls of bad driving
2 year(s) ago via
Dan Cushman Miyamoto...Elderly drivers cause just as many accidents as young drivers when you factor in miles driven. Just think of how many accidents, injuries, and deaths can be saved by having less number of 65 years olds on the road in a year. Why don't we just ban everyone from driving? Then there will be NO accidents!
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Miyamoto Musashi Not necessarily. The issue is maturity, responsibility and accountability. Your underlying interest is not only education but also to see more cars on the road. You're not fooling anyone trying to divert the real intention here.
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Ford Motor Company @Miyamoto: the answer is not to remove younger drivers from the road, but to educate them about good driving habits - skills that they can retain for life (hence our Driving Skills for Life program). Otherwise, we're just delaying the arrival of poor drivers on the road, not preventing them.
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Miyamoto Musashi It makes little sense to allow a 16 year old to drive while he/she can't vote in primaries and general elections, illegal to drink, illegal to buy cigarettes, illegal to possess firearams/ammunitions, and can't enlist into the armed forces. The law of the land must change to be consistent with other boundaries and limitations aforementioned. Just think how many accidents, injuries, and deaths can be saved by having less number of 16 years old on the road in a year.
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Ford Motor Company Check out our Driving Skills For Life page: http://Facebook.com/FordDrivingSkillsForLife
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Branden Eilander Not just teens, elderly too, I have been pulled in front of some many time by them and slam on my brakes because there driving way under the speed limit
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Liz Carpenter Mine just got her permit! This is my 3rd and last child to teach! All 3 taught in Fords! This one is being taught in my 1994 Crown Vic, my favorite of all my fords! I'll have to find her a different car to drive full time because she isn't going to get a car with this much power!!
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Allen Liebing Take away thier cell-phones.
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Clint Smart Wish my young bloke had seen this this afternoon, he got T boned today making a U turn. bloody lucky he wasn't killed, thank God.
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Ford Insider hoping so
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Kelly Marie Choices will undergrade or upgrade...
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Richard Pawl its not the mustang that cant drive in the winter...its the driver
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Ashley Charlebois Make the ford mustang able to drive in the winter! But it's still way to nice and sporty for the winter:D GO MUSTANGS
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Keirsten Herzig My child is taking Drivers Ed at AAA as I type this. The shoe-in to have her take it with them???? They use FORD vehicles and we drive FORD!!!
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Richard Pawl impatience is a big problem, teens mostly because they are inexperienced, but impatience is a problem with everyone...i am not saying drive like you'll die every second, but mostly awareness of your surroundings and how to tell when someone is driving like a complete moron, defensive driving is a great idea, only works if the information is used to drive safe and not knock someone off the road simply because you don't like them, scare tactics don't work either with driving, just makes someone more nervous and then traffic is jammed because you rattled their brain with horrendous car crashes, in short, take a look at finland's licensing and you'll know whats best to do...finland is the hardest place to get a license because the weather there is torturous at times
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Jay Doverspike Current Ford Technicians. I created a facebook page for techs like you and I. Its a page where techs can connect. Please search Ford Technicians. And like the page with Henry Ford's picture on it. We got about 40 techs now and grow every day. Thanks.
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Maria Elena i love ford
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Daniel Suta Pretty much the main thing that will help drivers become better drivers is making taking a defensive driving course Mandatory in getting your licence, upping from a red p to a green p and every 5 years after that. To keep drivers aware what kind of danger they are on the road. A vehicle is a portable killing machine....
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
Gregory Gilbert Josepy Mclean ford is the best car and truck around
2 year(s) ago via Facebook
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