Ask Ford
Q.

Why is there not a diesel powertrain option for passenger vehicles in the U.S.?

A.

Ford does offer a diesel engine in the U.S. – it’s our new 6.7-liter Power Stroke available in the Super Duty pickup. For passenger cars, there are no immediate plans to offer diesel engines for several reasons. The diesel engine, with its high-pressure fuel injection system and precious-metals laden emissions, is considerably more expensive than gasoline engines. Diesel fuel is more expensive than gasoline in the U.S. We achieve two thirds of the fuel economy gains of a diesel engine with our EcoBoost technology for much less cost, which is the right thing to do in these tough economic times. Our EcoBoost engines incorporate many of the same traits and technologies found in today’s diesels, such as high compression pistons and turbocharging. That said, Ford is constantly listening to its customers, and if demand grows to the point where selling a diesel-powered passenger car in North America makes good business sense, we can have one in our line up. In the immediate future, however, we believe that our new generation of gasoline-electric hybrids, plug-ins and battery electric vehicles offer customers the Power of Choice to choose the fuel efficient powertrain that best suits their needs. Richard T., Ford Powertrain Communications Manager

9 COMMENTS ON THIS QUESTION
bob Like others, I'm waiting for a diesel passenger car made by someone other than VW/Audi/MB. Mazda is said to come out with one soon. Fiat may add one to its 500. Mini Cooper is thinking about it. Here's a sweet looking vehicle: http://media.ford.com/news/newfordfiestavancombinesclassleadingfueleconomywithsharplooksandsmarttechnologies.htm. (76mpg Europe) However, I'm not as gung ho about seeing Ford stick a diesel in their cars as I used to be because of the electrical problems with Sync. Well, I've got 100k miles to go on my Subaru (it is at 100k now), so I still have some time to wait for more diesel passenger cars. Perhaps in 5 years Ford will both see the light re: diesel, and also work on its quality issues.
1 year(s) ago via
Normand G well said, I too will not put my money on a gasser and far less on a hybrid(just have a look at what the residual value is given by the leasing companies on contract compared to a comparable diesel unit! ! !
1 year(s) ago via
Normand G well said, I too will not put my money on a gasser and far less on a hybrid(just have a look at what the residual value is given by the leasing companies on contract compared to a comparable diesel unit! ! !
1 year(s) ago via
Dale Ok, I'll chime in. We bought a 2006 beetle TDI new and love it. I for one will never go back to a gasser. I am merely biding my time to see which car company is going to deliver what I want. What I think alot of US drivers want is a smallish size crossover/suv with a small diesel that can do double duty for mild/moderate towing demands/needs without breaking the bank ala Audi/MB. If VW puts a TDI in the Tiguan and makes it available in the US and there are no other alternatives I know where my money is going. I think if ford put a small diesel in the Ford edge it would be a winner and a viable alternative. You certainly won't be getting any money from me without a small diesel in your lineup and I'd bet I'm not alone in my thinking.
1 year(s) ago via
Waves N Here's an answer to your "questionable market segment" comment, According to the Diesel Technology Forum, domestic diesel auto sales have increased by an impressive 37.0 percent over 2010 compared to the overall auto market’s 10.4 percent increase. In August 2011, diesel sales were up 20 percent, while hybrid sales were down 11 percent and the overall market was up 7.5 percent. By 2015, Baum and Associates expects diesel car sales to grow to 6.0 to 6.5 percent of the entire U.S. market, compared to just over 3.0 percent today. The research firm J.D. Power & Associates sees the U.S. diesel market share growing steadily to 7.4 percent by 2017.
2 year(s) ago via
Waves N A questionable market segment? Are you kidding? I only made it through 4 pages of posts regarding diesels and hybrid diesels. Volvo sold out of its V60 before it even made it to the showroom floor. The only reason I am here is because I beleive Ford is the only car company in the US capable of making this happen, and you think that the US doesn't want small turbodiesels? I guess I should just move to Costa Rica. They say it is the happiest country on earth, must be all those fuel sippin diesels they get to drive that Ford made and they can't drive em in the US.
2 year(s) ago via
Scott M @David: it's not as simple as just bringing a European diesel engine over to the U.S. If that were the case, don't you think we'd have done so before? We would need to create entirely new engine plants at the cost of hundreds of millions of dollars to satisfy a questionable market segment.
2 year(s) ago via
Brian L I agree, people that have been to places that the diesel cars are available and how sweet they were. A six cylinder power stroke would be sweet in the Expedition and also the F-150!
2 year(s) ago via
David Duggan It's about choice. While you are right that your new engines come close or even surpass diesel engines. Imagine if you applied these technologies to a new diesel (or say, one you sell in Europe), then the diesel will outperform the gasser. It is an unfair comparison to put old information about old diesels against new information about new gassers.
2 year(s) ago via
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